Scalloped Hook-tip

  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip
  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip
  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip
  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip
  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip
  • Scalloped Hook-tip
    Scalloped Hook-tip

Scientific name: Falcaria lacertinaria

Two generations. Late April to late June and mid-July to August, except in Scotland where there is one generation from late Mat to June. Common and widespread across Britain.

An unmistakable moth with an irregularly scalloped edge to the forewing. At rest the wings are folded like a tent over the body resembling a dried leaf. There are two dark parallel cross-lines and a small dark dot between them. The females are more yellow-orange in colour whereas the males are more grey-brown.

The adults fly at night and are attracted to light. The larvae can be seen from June to July and August to September before overwintering as pupae in a folded leaf from the foodplant, dropping to the ground with the leaves as they are shed before winter.

Size and Family

  • Family – Hook-tips (Drepanidae)
  • Small Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 28-36mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Downy Birch (Betula pubescens) and Silver Birch (Betula pendula).

Habitat

Usually found in woodland, scrub, heathland and bogs. Also found in garden and hedgerows.

Distribution

  • Countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
  • Well distributed in England north to Yorkshire and Cumbria, Wales, Ireland and mainland Scotland into some of the Hebrides. Rare in the Channel Islands.