Yellow Horned

  • Yellow Horned
    Yellow Horned
  • Yellow Horned
    Yellow Horned
  • Yellow Horned
    Yellow Horned
  • Yellow Horned
    Yellow Horned

Scientific name: Achlya flavicornis

Late February to mid-April. Two subspecies – one common across much of England, and one common to mainland Scotland. This moth gets its name from its distinctive orange antennae.

The forewings of the English subspecies are grey or greenish-white with a large pale spot near the centre of the leading edge. The Scottish subspecies is a darker grey. They fly at night and are attracted to light but might also fly during the day on sunny afternoons.

The caterpillars can be found from mid-May to mid-July feeding at night and resting between two leaves spun flat together during the day. They overwinter as pupae on the ground amongst leaf litter.

Size and Family

  • Family – Thyatridae
  • Medium Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 34-40mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Silver Birch (Betula pendula) and Downy Birch (Betula pubescens)

Habitat

Woodland as well as heathland and moorland with birch scrub

Distribution

  • Countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
  • Spp. galbanus well distributed throughout most of England from Cornwall to Northumberland, in Ireland and parts of Wales. Spp. scotica well distributed in mainland Scotland.

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