Pearl-bordered Fritillary (Boloria euphrosyne)

Recent Activity

Monitoring

Since 2012, in partnership with Forestry Commission Scotland, we have been increasing monitoring of Pearl-bordered Fritillary in Scotland to enable a robust national (Scottish) trend to be calculated for the butterfly on the National Forest Estate (NFE), as well as compare its performance between NFE land and the rest of the UK.  The target was to monitor a minimum of twenty sites annually in order to detect changes over relatively short periods of time (five years).  Over the three years Pearl-bordered Fritillary was monitored at between 50-57 sites across the butterfly’s range, using a combination of contractors and Butterfly Conservation Scotland volunteers.

Management Advice

In partnership with Forestry Commission Scotland management advice has been given at a number of sites in recent years directly to landowners and/or their woodland agents.  This has included populations on designated sites e.g. at Glasdrum as well as those in the wider landscape e.g. Glensanda and Carr Brae.

Habitat Management

Annual Butterfly Conservation Scotland volunteer work parties have been undertaken in recent years at two Pearl-bordered Fritillary sites that are either not eligible or feasible for funding under the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP).  This has included a site on the NFE and one under private ownership.  The work has involved scrub clearance and bracken raking to enhance the establishment of both larval foodplants and adult nectar plants. 

Future Plans

Monitoring

The increased monitoring outlined above will continue in 2015 and hopefully beyond.

Management Advice

The partnership with Forestry Commission Scotland to provide advice to woodland owners and agents to enhance Pearl-bordered Fritillary habitat and populations will continue.

Habitat Management

Butterfly Conservation Scotland volunteer’s will continue to undertake annual work parties at the two sites outlined above and possibly at other sites should the need arise.

Links for more information

Butterfly Conservation Scotland’s Learn About the Pearl-bordered Fritillary

pearl-bordered-fritillary-leaflet.pdf

 

Marsh Fritillary (Euphydryas aurinia)

Recent activity

Monitoring

A Marsh Fritillary monitoring workshop was held by Butterfly Conservation Scotland in Oban in September 2013.  The aim was to introduce a more robust larval web monitoring methodology, particularly relevant at larger sites where repeatable monitoring can be daunting to establish and very subjective. 

Management Advice

In partnership with landowners and their agents management advice has continued to be provided following the cessation of the very successful and award winning Species Action Framework Marsh Fritillary Project in 2012.  However, this has proved to be more difficult as the requirements to gain entry into the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) Rural Priorities (RP) Scheme have become increasingly difficult, thereby resulting in a large reduction in interest and fewer new applicants.

Habitat Monitoring

A number of sites being managed under SRDP specifically for Marsh Fritillary were revisited and Butterfly Conservation Scotland’s standard Marsh Fritillary habitat condition survey, based on measuring habitat attributes (both positive and negative), was repeated.

Future Plans

Monitoring

Continue to encourage the adoption of the “new” more robust larval web monitoring methodology with the additional aim of increasing the number of sites monitored in Scotland.

Management Advice

It is hoped that the recent launch of the new Scottish Rural Development Programme Agri-environment and Climate Scheme within which Marsh Fritillary is designated a national priority will see an upsurge in interest from landowners and land managers wanting to enter suitable Marsh Fritillary habitat into the new scheme.

Habitat Monitoring

The results of the repeat Marsh Fritillary habitat condition survey need to be collated and analysed.

Links for more information