The Twin-spotted Quaker is a variable species but the blackish twin spots are usually obvious and the diagnostic feature of this common moth. The male is easily identified by the feathered antennae.

Feeding at night, the caterpillars can be found between April and June, resting during the day amongst leaves when small and hides in bark crevices when larger. Overwinters as a pupa with the adult moth fully formed inside before emerging the following spring.

The adult moth feeds at sallow catkins but can be attracted to light and sugar.

Flight Season

Flies from March to April in one generation but can sometimes be seen earlier.

Size and Family

  • Family – Hadenines
  • Medium Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 38-44mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Caterpillars feed on a wide range of trees and woody plants, including oak (Quercus), aspen (Populus tremulata), sallow (Salix), field maple (Acer campestre), sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa), ash (Fraxinus), honeysuckle (Lonicera) and hop (Humulus lupulus).

Habitat

Can be found in broadleaved woodland and sometimes gardens.

Distribution

  • Countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
  • Well distributed throughout most of England, Wales and Ireland and increasing its range in Scotland.
Twin-spotted Quaker - Iain Leach

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Peter Maton

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Peter Maton

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Iain Leach

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Derek Parker

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Iain Leach

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker - Iain Leach

Twin-spotted Quaker

Twin-spotted Quaker (caterpillar) - Ryszard Szczygieł

Twin-spotted Quaker (caterpillar)