The only British emerald moth which is not green in colour, the wings are beige or brown with subtle reddish freckling.

The adults fly at night and area attracted to light. At rest they hang from grass stems and can be disturbed from vegetation during the day. The caterpillars can be found from August to late the following May overwintering as small larvae on the foodplant near the ground.

There are two distinct yellow bands on the abdomen but sometimes there are additional faint bands. The antennae are black.

The caterpillars spend two years feeding in thin stems of the foodplant, overwintering as larvae.

The males are more brightly coloured and smaller than the females, with a distinctive bright orange-brown forewing and two dark-edged white lines forming an open V. The females are a duller brown. When at rest they hold their elongated wings almost vertically against their body.

The adults have short antennae and have no functioning mouthparts so cannot feed. The caterpillars can be found from September to the following May or June, overwintering twice as larvae so the life cycle takes two years to complete.

The females are duller with broad grey-brown bands across the forewings. When at rest their elongated wings are held almost vertically against their body.

The adults have short antennae and have no functioning mouthparts so cannot feed. The caterpillars can be found from June to late the following May, overwintering twice as larvae so the life cycle takes two years to complete.

Their English name is derived from the males of the spp. humuli which are entirely white, however the females are larger with a striking yellow forewing with distinctive orange markings. The Shetland spp. thulensis is smaller with a creamy white forewing marked with brown. When at rest they hold their elongated wings almost vertically against their body.

Somewhat similar in appearance to the Pebble Hook-tip (Drepana falcataria falcataria) with warm brown colouring and wings held out flat at rest. However, the central spots on the forewings are small and the hindwings have a strong cross-line.

The larvae are found in mainland Europe where the breeding takes place and they overwinter as pupae similarly to the other species of Hook-tips.

The forewings have two well-defined pale cross-lines and two blackish spots in the centre. The males are often darker and smaller than the female. The males can occasionally be seen flying high around oak trees.

The larvae can be seen from June to July and late August to September which then overwinter as pupae in a tough brown cocoon which is spun inside a tightly folded oak leaf.

An unmistakeable and distinctive moth with broad, strongly hooked forewings with a scalloped edge and white cross-lines. The wings are dark greyish-brown with colourful orange blotches near the base and centre of the forewings.

The adults overwinter in caves, barns or outbuildings. They are most often found feeding after dark on flowers and overripe berries. The caterpillars can be found from May to July and again in August in the south.

An attractive moth with a broad, slightly hooked forewing. Grey-brown in colour with a striking golden-yellow central cross-band, oval and kidney-shaped forewing markings.

Overwinters as an egg. The larvae are present from April to August, feeding inside the lower stem of the foodplant where they also pupate.

Distinguished from other large eggar moths by the diagonal cross line on the forewing and two small white spots. Males are usually a warm reddish-brown with yellowish patches. The females are larger and can vary in colour from deep yellow to a very pale buff, whitish or a darker reddish-brown similar to the male. In the fens of East Anglia the males are often yellowish.

The adults fly at night and are attracted to light, the males especially.

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