A small sandy-brown moth with a rather pointed forewing, often fading to a lighter shade of brown.

Easily disturbed by day from grass swords, where it rests on the stems. Flies from late afternoon, at dusk and after dark. Comes to light, sometimes in large numbers. Overwinters as a part-grown caterpillar, on stems near the ground.

Flight Season

Flies from Mid-June to early August in one generation, usually ending by the third week of July.

An unmistakable and attractive moth whose English name comes from the heart-shaped markings in the central part of the forewings. The scientific names refer to the two circular markings next to the ‘heart’ on the forewings, Dicycla meaning ‘two-circle’, and oo literally meaning ‘double O’.

The Feathered Thorn is unlike any other moth likely to be flying very late in the year. The rich reddish-brown adults rest with wings flat and have a slightly hooked tip ti the forewing, males have broadly feathered antennae.

Can occasionally be found below trees and bushes or low on trunks, the male is often seen on the wing after dark and comes to light, often in numbers, usually several hours after dusk. Females are seen less frequently.

A local species, So-called because of the caterpillars habit of eating away the parenchyma from the upper surface of leaves of the foodplant, within a silk web, resulting in a skeleton leaf appearance.

Adults can be seen resting by day on leaves but are also attracted to light.

Flight Season

Flies in two generations, from June-July and again from late August to March when it overwinters, has been recorded in May.

An unmistakable moth, the English name of this species is derived from the moth's fanciful resemblance to burnt paper with its crumpled appearance.

 Adults are rarely seen by day, possibly roost in the tree canopy, but are attracted to sugar, but only usually the males to light. Caterpillars can be found from late June to mid-September and winter is spent as a pupa, in a cocoon in the ground.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from Mid-May to late June or early July.

A very scarce visitor to the British Isles, with only two records - one attracted to light in East Sussex in May 1985 and a second found in the docks of East London in July 1995.

The caterpillar has not been found in Britain.

Flight Season

Adults could be seen in the UK between May and July.

Size and Family

  • Family: Hawk-moths (Sphingidae)
  • Size: Medium, 37-42mm wingspan

Particular Caterpillar Food Plants

Evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) as well as willowherb (Epilobium)

This large, powerful butterfly is usually seen flying swiftly over the tops of bracken or low vegetation in woodland clearings. In flight, the males are almost impossible to separate from those of the Dark Green Fritillary, which often share the same habitats. However, both species frequently visit flowers such as thistles and Bramble where it is possible to see their distinctive underside wing markings. The Dark Green lacks the orange ringed 'pearls' on the underside of the hindwing.

The Large Tortoiseshell was once widespread across Britain and most common in the woodlands of central and southern England but while its numbers were always known to fluctuate, it declined to extinction by the 1960s. This butterfly has not been recorded from Ireland.

It is still common in some parts of Europe, but declining in others. There continue to be sporadic records in Britain, the majority from the south coast but some are considered to be of specimens released from reared stock rather than genuine immigrants.

This striking moth rests with wings open and half-raised and forewings slightly curled. Can be distinguished from the similar Lunar Thorn by a dark central spot towards the outer edge of the hindwing upperside. The central silver crescent on the forewing is also larger on the Purple Thorn. Second generation moths are typically smaller and paler.

The caterpillars can be found from late May to early July and again in from August to September in southern England.Overwinters as a pupa, just below ground.

The adult moths are rarely seen apart from when attracted to light.

The male of this common species has a brownish forewing that is quite variable but can be distinguished by a row of black dots along the edge of both fore- and hindwing. The similar looking Mottled Umber lacks these markings and are less conspicuous in the Scarce Umber.

Caterpillars can be found between April and mid-June. Overwinters as a pupa underground

Males come to light and sometimes in large numbers while the female can be found by day resting on tree-trunks.

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