Flies from dusk into the night when it is attracted to light.

Flight Season

Flies from June and July, and again in August and September in two generations.

Size and Family

  • Family – Erebidae
  • Small Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 18-22mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Relatively common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Caterpillars feed on various grasses

Habitat

Damp meadows and woodland

Not found in the UK.

Size and Family

  • Family: Nymphalids
  • Size: Medium
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 35-55mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on leaves of the Nettle-tree (Celtis australis)

Habitat

Open light woodland but also shrubs and even urban places

Not found in the UK.

Size and Family

  • Family: Nymphalids
  • Size: Large
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 65-90mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on leaves of the Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)

Habitat

Wooded hillsides with plenty of foodplant but can sometimes be found in town centres.

Not found in the UK. Adults fly in a single brood from late May through to August. Winter is spent as an egg or young caterpillar.

Size and Family

  • Family: Nymphalids / Fritillaries
  • Size: Medium
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 30-44mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on Bramble.

Not found in the UK.

Overwinters as a caterpillar.

Size and Family

  • Family: Blues & Hairstreaks
  • Size: Small
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 20-30mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on Common Bird's-foot-trefoil and Gorse.

Habitat

Grassy, flowery places such as Meadows, farmland and wasteland.

Not found in the UK. This striking butterfly exhibits seasonal dimorphism, having two forms, levana and prorsa that represent the spring and summer broods. levana individuals are primarily orange in colour, giving them the appearance of a small fritillary, whereas prorsa individuals look more like a small White Admiral.

Not found in the UK. There are two forms of this magnificent butterfly - the blue form ilia and the orange-brown form clytie, the latter is more commonly encountered in southern regions of its distribution.

A small sandy-brown moth with a rather pointed forewing, often fading to a lighter shade of brown.

Easily disturbed by day from grass swords, where it rests on the stems. Flies from late afternoon, at dusk and after dark. Comes to light, sometimes in large numbers. Overwinters as a part-grown caterpillar, on stems near the ground.

Flight Season

Flies from Mid-June to early August in one generation, usually ending by the third week of July.

An unmistakable and attractive moth whose English name comes from the heart-shaped markings in the central part of the forewings. The scientific names refer to the two circular markings next to the ‘heart’ on the forewings, Dicycla meaning ‘two-circle’, and oo literally meaning ‘double O’.

The Feathered Thorn is unlike any other moth likely to be flying very late in the year. The rich reddish-brown adults rest with wings flat and have a slightly hooked tip ti the forewing, males have broadly feathered antennae.

Can occasionally be found below trees and bushes or low on trunks, the male is often seen on the wing after dark and comes to light, often in numbers, usually several hours after dusk. Females are seen less frequently.

Subscribe to Orange