Until recently this was only a rare immigrant to mainland Britain, but it is now resident in small numbers in Devon. It also appears occasionally elsewhere on the south-west coast and is resident in the Channel Islands.

Flight Times

Flies in July and August, and then in September and October. The second brood overwinters as an adult and reappears in the spring.

Size and Family

  • Family – Erebidae

  • Small Sized

The English name of the Twenty-plume Moth is something of a misnomer, as each wing is separated into 6 'plumes'. The scientific name is more accurate, meaning 'six-fingered'.

The only British member of its family, the moth is nocturnal and attracted to light.

Flight Times

Flies all-year-round.

Size and Family

  • Family – Alucitidae

  • Small Sized

  • Wingspan Range – 14-16mm

Conservation Status

  • UK BAP: Not listed

  • Fairly common

The females of the Pale Brindled Beauty are completely wingless, or apterous, a feature which is often found in moths which emerge in the winter months.

This species shows marked melanism, the black form f. monacharia being commoner than the typical form in certain parts.

Flight Times

Males fly from January to March, searching for the females which have climbed up tree-trunks.

Size and Family

  • Family – Geometridae

  • Medium Sized

A species of autumn and spring, the Red-green Carpet can be seen in September and October before hibernating as an adult and flying again in the early spring.

The adult moth has a subtle combination of reddish and green colours which can sometimes appear to change, depending on the light.

Flight Times

Flies in September and October, hibernating as an adult and flying again in early spring.

Size and Family

  • Family – Geometridae

  • Small/Medium Sized

A migrant species that can sometimes arrive in large influxes with other migrants.

The Rusty Dot Pearl has multiple generations each year, usually spending winter as a pupa in the soil.

Caterpillars can reach a length of 10–15 millimetres (0.39–0.59 in. The adult moth flies at night and is attracted to light.

Flight Times

Primarily a migrant species to the UK but can be found at almost any time of the year.

Size and Family

  • Family – Crambidae

  • Small Sized 

One of our more common winter moths, especially during mild spells, and can be found feeding at sallow blossom in early spring

Flight Season

Flies from September through to May.

Size and Family

  • Family – Noctuidae
  • Small Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 28-36mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Caterpillars feed on the foliage of a range of trees, including birch (Betula) and oak (Quercus).

The name 'Wax Moth' refers to the moth's lifestyle - it lives in beehives, where the larvae feed on the honeycomb. Adults can be attracted to light.

The males of this species have a distinctively concave outer edge to the forewing; the females are generally plainer in appearance with a less concave edge.

Flight Season

Flies between June and October.

The Vestal is a migrant species, occurring primarily in southern England but in varying numbers. In good immigration years, several hundred may appear, almost anywhere in Britain.

The amount and intensity of the pink pigmentation varies. Native to southern Europe and North Africa.

It flies mainly at night and is regularly attracted to light.

Flight Season

Most UK records are from August to October.

Chestnut-brown or grey-brown moth with broad, round forewings. Central cross-band relatively broad in trailing half, with no waist, major indentation or scalloping. Single dark dash at wing tip distinctive between similar species Juniper Carpet which has several dark dashes near tip and scalloped central band.

Unlikely to be seen far from Common Juniper.

Adults are attracted to light. Overwinters as small larvae. Larvae occur from September to early June; pupates among leaves or fallen needles of foodplant.

An elusive moth but can be found at rest on foodplants Ash and Wild Privet and flitting about after dark. Comes to light in small numbers.

A brown or blackish central crossband is diagnostic for this species, elbowed and divided in two in the leading half of the rounded, tapering forewing. There is little variation in this marking, but it can vary in intensity and width. Males have a small lobe on the hind wing.

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