Not found in the UK.

Size and Family

  • Family: Blues
  • Size: Small / Medium
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 30-36mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Vulnerable

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on Marsh Gentian (Gentiana pneumonanthe)

Habitat

Damp meadows below 1000m

Not found in the UK.

Overwinters as a caterpillar.

Size and Family

  • Family: Blues & Hairstreaks
  • Size: Small
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 20-30mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on Common Bird's-foot-trefoil and Gorse.

Habitat

Grassy, flowery places such as Meadows, farmland and wasteland.

Not found in the UK. This striking butterfly exhibits seasonal dimorphism, having two forms, levana and prorsa that represent the spring and summer broods. levana individuals are primarily orange in colour, giving them the appearance of a small fritillary, whereas prorsa individuals look more like a small White Admiral.

A small sandy-brown moth with a rather pointed forewing, often fading to a lighter shade of brown.

Easily disturbed by day from grass swords, where it rests on the stems. Flies from late afternoon, at dusk and after dark. Comes to light, sometimes in large numbers. Overwinters as a part-grown caterpillar, on stems near the ground.

Flight Season

Flies from Mid-June to early August in one generation, usually ending by the third week of July.

This species has an annual life cycle. It flies by day in a spinning motion that can be difficult to follow. Adults are seen in May, June and into July, but has been recorded in late April, August and September. The caterpillar feeds from July until autumn on the leaves and flowers of the foodplant, goldenrod, inhabiting a slight silken web under the lower leaves.

An unmistakable and attractive moth whose English name comes from the heart-shaped markings in the central part of the forewings. The scientific names refer to the two circular markings next to the ‘heart’ on the forewings, Dicycla meaning ‘two-circle’, and oo literally meaning ‘double O’.

A local species, So-called because of the caterpillars habit of eating away the parenchyma from the upper surface of leaves of the foodplant, within a silk web, resulting in a skeleton leaf appearance.

Adults can be seen resting by day on leaves but are also attracted to light.

Flight Season

Flies in two generations, from June-July and again from late August to March when it overwinters, has been recorded in May.

An unmistakable moth, the English name of this species is derived from the moth's fanciful resemblance to burnt paper with its crumpled appearance.

 Adults are rarely seen by day, possibly roost in the tree canopy, but are attracted to sugar, but only usually the males to light. Caterpillars can be found from late June to mid-September and winter is spent as a pupa, in a cocoon in the ground.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from Mid-May to late June or early July.

The Feathered Gothic is common and well distributed throughout most of Britain but very local further north. Adults are regularly attracted to light, particularly males.

Winter is spent as an egg, these are scattered over grassland while the moth is in flight. The caterpillars can be found between March and July, feeding at night, at first on the leaves and when larger, on ground level on the stems.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from August to September.

This micro moth is only 3 or 4mm long and is dark grey with silvery-white streaks and a black spot at the apex. Seen during the summer months, it is a very common species in much of Britain and Ireland, where it can be found on sunny days visiting flowers, especially those of buttercup (Ranunculus) and Daisy (Asteraceae). There can sometimes be more than two dozen adults to a single flower.

Easily overlooked but when inspected closely, the moths can be recognised as they slowly 'pump' their wings open and closed. Occasionally comes to light.

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