This moth can be distinguished from the Large Red-belted and Red-tipped Clearwings by the absence of any red markings on the forewings.

The adults are occasionally seen resting on tree trunks in the early morning. The caterpillars feed inside the trunk of the tree from August to the following May, overwintering as part-grown larvae.

This moth can be distinguished from the Large Red-belted and Red-tipped Clearwings by the absence of any red markings on the forewings.

The adults are occasionally seen flying around apple trees in the afternoon. The caterpillars can be found feeding underneath the bark of the foodplant from August to the following May, overwintering as larvae.

The adult females can occasionally be seen laying their eggs on freshly-cut birch tree stumps. The caterpillars feed inside the tree stump or trunk from July to the following May, overwintering as larvae inside a cocoon.

The grey forewings are crossed by jagged cross-lines and bands. The red hindwing which gives it the English name has a black band around the scalloped margin, fringed with white. Another irregular black band runs across the centre of the red patch of the hindwing.

The larvae can be found from May to July feeding at night and hiding under loose bark or in a crevice during the day. They overwinter as eggs.

Very similar to red forms of the Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, although the Red Twin-spot Carpet tends to have brighter markings, with a clearer whiter band bordering the central red band and has a more banded appearance.

Rests during the day on shaded rocks, stone walls, bushes, hedges and tree trunks from which it is easily disturbed. Flies from dusk and into the night.

Cannot be confused with any other species. A sandy brown moth with many red-brown cross-lines, although the female tends to be paler and smaller than the male. This moth rests on stems with the paler hindwing partially exposed.

Flies in the afternoon in dry, sunny weather and again after dark, and can be common where it occurs. Hides amongst vegetation in dull or overcast conditions.

Forewing colour ranges from light grey to tawny brown, usually with a reddish central cross-band. Similar to the Red Twin-spot Carpet but lacking the two spots near the outer edge of the forewing. Also similar to the Flame Carpet, but this species has two obvious projections on the outer edge of the red central band.  The wings of the Red Carpet are also more pointed than in the other two species with a darker diagonal mark at the tip.

Flies at dusk, but easily disturbed when at rest during the day on walls, tree trunks and shady rocks.

Superficially similar to several of the other burnet moths, but perhaps closest to the Five-spot Burnet. The New Forest Burnet has a round-tipped forewing with five clearly defined red spots and a dark area beyond. It is smaller and stouter than the Five-spot Burnet, with more slender and weakly clubbed antennae. The Five-spot Burnet also has more pointed wings.

If disturbed the moth displays its orange hindwings with blue-black spots and can produce a clear yellow fluid from two ducts just behind the head.

The larvae can be seen from August to late the following June. The larvae are hairy and known as the "Woolly Bear". They sometimes feed and bask in sunshine and may be seen moving rapidly across bare ground when fully grown. They pupate in a thin cocoon among vegetation on or near the ground.

Superficially similar to several of the other burnet moths, but readily distinguished by the thinly-scaled forewing with three blunt red streaks. Rarely this red colour is replaced by black, orange or yellow. The Slender Scotch Burnet and Scotch Burnet are also thinly-scaled, but are usually smaller and have distinct spots rather than streaks.

Flies in warm weather, preferring sunshine. During dull weather it can be found sitting exposed on flowerheads or grass stems. Visits nectar sources, such as Wild Thyme.

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