An unmistakable and attractive moth whose English name comes from the heart-shaped markings in the central part of the forewings. The scientific names refer to the two circular markings next to the ‘heart’ on the forewings, Dicycla meaning ‘two-circle’, and oo literally meaning ‘double O’.

The Feathered Thorn is unlike any other moth likely to be flying very late in the year. The rich reddish-brown adults rest with wings flat and have a slightly hooked tip ti the forewing, males have broadly feathered antennae.

Can occasionally be found below trees and bushes or low on trunks, the male is often seen on the wing after dark and comes to light, often in numbers, usually several hours after dusk. Females are seen less frequently.

A rather long-winged species, the Black Rustic is a distinctive moth that is common in the south with a scattered distribution in the north.

Adults come to light and sugar but can also be seen feeding on the flowers of Ivy and even overripe Blackberries.

Caterpillars can be found between October and May, overwintering as small larvae and feeding at night, hiding low down by day. Pupates underground.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from September to October, slightly earlier in the north.

An unmistakable moth, the English name of this species is derived from the moth's fanciful resemblance to burnt paper with its crumpled appearance.

 Adults are rarely seen by day, possibly roost in the tree canopy, but are attracted to sugar, but only usually the males to light. Caterpillars can be found from late June to mid-September and winter is spent as a pupa, in a cocoon in the ground.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from Mid-May to late June or early July.

The Feathered Gothic is common and well distributed throughout most of Britain but very local further north. Adults are regularly attracted to light, particularly males.

Winter is spent as an egg, these are scattered over grassland while the moth is in flight. The caterpillars can be found between March and July, feeding at night, at first on the leaves and when larger, on ground level on the stems.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from August to September.

Sometimes referred to as the Olive-tree Pearl or Jasmine moth, it is a migrant from southern Europe where it is widespread but numbers arriving to the UK fluctuate annually. Most often seen in the southern coastal counties. Wings are translucent white with a slight sheen and a yellowish-brown edge.

Flies at night and comes to light, occasionally found feeding on flowers such as Buddleia and Ivy.

Flight Season

Flies from June to early December but most commonly seen in the UK during late summer and autumn.

A migrant to the UK, it has been recorded less than four hundred times, most often at light from coastal counties of England but numbers are increasing, possibly supported by transitory breeding. Easily recognised by large metallic silver 'dog-leg' mark in the centre of a pinkish-brown bar on the forewing.

In mainland Europe, it is widely distributed and expanding its range westwards since the end of the 19th Century. Can be found on the continent from spring to late autumn in two broods, sometimes seen flying by day. Spends the winter as a young caterpillar.

A very scarce visitor to the British Isles, with only two records - one attracted to light in East Sussex in May 1985 and a second found in the docks of East London in July 1995.

The caterpillar has not been found in Britain.

Flight Season

Adults could be seen in the UK between May and July.

Size and Family

  • Family: Hawk-moths (Sphingidae)
  • Size: Medium, 37-42mm wingspan

Particular Caterpillar Food Plants

Evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) as well as willowherb (Epilobium)

This fairly distinctive and furry moth occurs locally throughout a large part of Britain. While variable, it is generally larger than the Pale Brindled Beauty, with a thicker thorax and abdomen, and broader wings.

The adult moths can sometimes be found resting on tree trunks and fences by day but the male is also attracted to light late at night, sometimes in large numbers. The female is rarely seen.

This furry moth is common throughout most of England but has a more local distribution further north.

The caterpillars feed at night, hiding between spun leaves by day and can be found from late May to early July and again in September to early October in the south. In the north, they are usually only encountered from late June to September.

Winter is spent as a pupa, in a cocoon that is typically formed among leaf litter, under moss or at the base of a tree.

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