The males have triangular grey-brown forewings with dark-edged jagged crossbands which are distinctively held overlapping at rest. The females are completely wingless with a barrel-shaped body and a tuft of hairs on the end of the abdomen. The adult males flay after dark and are attracted to light.

The light green caterpillars can be found from late April to June overwintering as pupae in a fragile cocoon under the ground.

The forewings of the English subspecies are grey or greenish-white with a large pale spot near the centre of the leading edge. The Scottish subspecies is a darker grey. They fly at night and are attracted to light but might also fly during the day on sunny afternoons.

The caterpillars can be found from mid-May to mid-July feeding at night and resting between two leaves spun flat together during the day. They overwinter as pupae on the ground amongst leaf litter.

Generally larger than the Common Lutestring. Look for a small dark dash at the leading edge of the forewing near the wing tip. The outer half of the forewing is usually a paler colour but a darker form f. albilinea is darker.

The adults fly at night and are attracted to light.

The caterpillars can be found from late July to mid-September feeding at night and resting between two leaves spun flat together during the day. They overwinter as pupae in a delicate cocoon between leaves of the foodplant which fall to the ground with the leaves in autumn.

The English subspecies or is similar in appearance to the Figure of Eighty but the cross-lines are more wavy, often thicker and more numerous. The Scottish subspecies scotica is sometimes a paler grey colour or occasionally brown. The Irish subspecies hibernica varies between the two others in colour with paler markings.

The adults fly at night and are attracted to light.

The adults can be identified by pale grey forewings with two dark brown cross-bands. In the darker form f. nubilata the forewings are mostly brown but the cross lines are still visible. They fly from early dusk and are attracted to light.

The caterpillars can be found from April to early July feeding at night and resting between two leaves spun flat together during the day. They overwinter as eggs attached to the foodplant.

The forewings are marbled with black and white markings. They fly at night and are attracted to light.

The caterpillars can be found from late May to mid-July feeding at night and resting on the underside of a leaf during the day. They overwinter as pupae under moss at the base of a tree in leaf litter or soil.

A brown moth with fine dark cross-lines on the forewings curving around the 80 mark. The forewings are broader then the Figure of Eight moth. The adults fly at night and are attracted to light.

The caterpillars can be found from mid-July to September feeding at night and resting between two leaves spun flat together during the day. They overwinter as pupae in a delicate cocoon between leaves of the foodplant which fall to the ground with the leaves in autumn.

Smaller than the Satin Lutestring. Can be identified by the pair of small dark spots in the centre of the forewing. The strength of the cross-lines varies considerably between forms. The darker form f. obscura is almost entirely grey-brown and is common across much of England. Draker forms are often found in London, Midlands and Scotland and forms with stronger bands are more often found in the north and west including Ireland.

The adults fly at night and are attracted to light.

The adults are dark reddish-brown in colour with a whitish spot in the centre of the forewings and a whitish cross-line below. The females are larger than the males and have a tuft of grey hairs at the end of the abdomen which they use to cover the egg batches.

The adults are incapable of feeding. They fly at night and are occasionally attracted to light traps. The caterpillars can be found living in groups from April to July before they overwinter as pupae, sometimes spending two or three winters in the cocoon.

A brown moth with gold central markings and a purplish-black markings near the hook-tips and along the wing edge but missing the central wing spots of the Pebble and Dusky Hook-tips. Rests with wings held out flat.

The adults are seldom seen, except in light traps. The larvae can be seen from late July to late September and are thought to live high in the canopy. They overwinter as pupae in a thin cocoon inside a curled leaf.

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