The rather bright green caterpillar is marked with black blotches and whitish lateral lines.

Flight Times

Flies from September onwards before hibernating and reappearing in March or April.

Size and Family

  • Family – Noctuidae

  • Medium Sized

  • Wingspan Range – 58-68mm

Conservation Status

  • UK BAP: Listed

  • Priority Species

Caterpillar Food Plants

The caterpillars feed on a variety of plants including dock (Rumex)

The females of the Pale Brindled Beauty are completely wingless, or apterous, a feature which is often found in moths which emerge in the winter months.

This species shows marked melanism, the black form f. monacharia being commoner than the typical form in certain parts.

Flight Times

Males fly from January to March, searching for the females which have climbed up tree-trunks.

Size and Family

  • Family – Geometridae

  • Medium Sized

A species of autumn and spring, the Red-green Carpet can be seen in September and October before hibernating as an adult and flying again in the early spring.

The adult moth has a subtle combination of reddish and green colours which can sometimes appear to change, depending on the light.

Flight Times

Flies in September and October, hibernating as an adult and flying again in early spring.

Size and Family

  • Family – Geometridae

  • Small/Medium Sized

A variable species but most often encountered as a reddish-brown ground colour with white or orange reniform stigmata. The small 'satellites' either side of the stigma can be obscure, especially in worn individuals.

Adult moths are attracted to sugar and light.

Flight Season

Flies from September through to April in one generation.

A variable species, with some strongly-banded individuals, others plain brownish with darker speckling. The females are completely wingless. Overwinter as an egg.

Flight Season

Flies from October into December in one generation.

Similar to other species and can be very difficult to separate on markings alone, especially as some show marked melanism.

Caterpillars can be found in late spring.

Flight Season

Flies from late September to November in one generation.

Size and Family

  • Family – Geometridae
  • Medium Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 38-44mm

Conservation status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Caterpillars feed on a variety of trees and shrubs.

The Mullein is more often found in the caterpillar stage than as an adult but can be seen when attracted to light.

Flight Season

Flies from April to May in one generation.

Size and Family

  • Family – Noctuidae
  • Medium Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 45-50mm

Conservation Status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Common

Caterpillar Food Plants

Caterpillars in the wild feed on species of mullein (Verbascum) and in gardens, on Buddleia.

The English population has two generations, with adults at large in April and May, and again in August and September. In Scotland the species is single-brooded, flying from June to July.

Size and Family

  • Family –
  • Medium Sized
  • Wingspan Range – 27-35mm

Conservation Status

  • UK BAP: Not listed
  • Local

Caterpillar Food Plants

The caterpillars feed on poplar (Populus), especially aspen (P. tremula) as well as sallow (Salix).

Habitat

Woodland

Not found in the UK.

Until recently, and as its name suggests, this butterfly was confined to southern and especially south-eastern Europe, but it is now spreading rapidly in a north-westerly direction, at the rate over 100 km per year. It was first found north of the Alps in France and in Germany in 2008 and has since gradually extended its range and was first sighted in the southern Netherlands in 2015. In 2019 it was reliably recorded near Calais in France. So there is only the matter of the 22 miles of English Channel to cross before it arrives on our shores!  

Extinct from the UK. The Black-veined White was first listed as a British species in 1667 but this large butterfly became extinct in the British Isles around 1925 with its last remaining stronghold in the south-east of England.

It was always considered a rarity in the British Isles but on the continent, it is often very common.

The female is known to rub her wings together and loses many of her scales by doing so, resulting in an almost-transparent look when compared with the white wings of the male. The reason behind this unusual behaviour is not known.

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