The Rosy Underwing is superficially similar to the native Red Underwing but is slightly smaller and paler looking. Comes to sugar and sometimes to light.

No evidence of breeding in the British Isles but in Europe, the caterpillars can be found between May and June.

There are less than two dozen records from the UK with the first from Shoreham, Sussex in 1875. First recorded on the Channel Islands in 2002 where it is now thought to be resident.

Flight Season

Flies from July to September in one generation, immigrants to the UK can be seen from August.

The Feathered Gothic is common and well distributed throughout most of Britain but very local further north. Adults are regularly attracted to light, particularly males.

Winter is spent as an egg, these are scattered over grassland while the moth is in flight. The caterpillars can be found between March and July, feeding at night, at first on the leaves and when larger, on ground level on the stems.

Flight Season

Flies in one generation from August to September.

This micro moth is only 3 or 4mm long and is dark grey with silvery-white streaks and a black spot at the apex. Seen during the summer months, it is a very common species in much of Britain and Ireland, where it can be found on sunny days visiting flowers, especially those of buttercup (Ranunculus) and Daisy (Asteraceae). There can sometimes be more than two dozen adults to a single flower.

Easily overlooked but when inspected closely, the moths can be recognised as they slowly 'pump' their wings open and closed. Occasionally comes to light.

Sometimes referred to as the Blue Underwing, the Clifden Nonpareil is a very large and impressively beautiful and rare moth.

This unmistakable insect is strongly attracted to sugar at dusk and will come to light but can also be seen by day at rest on tree trunks and walls. It has even been recorded flying inland from the sea.

Winter is spent as an egg on the foodplant with the caterpillars hatching the following spring when they can be found through to July, feeding at night. The pupa is made in a silken cocoon that is spun between leaves or among leaf litter.

This furry moth is common throughout most of England but has a more local distribution further north.

The caterpillars feed at night, hiding between spun leaves by day and can be found from late May to early July and again in September to early October in the south. In the north, they are usually only encountered from late June to September.

Winter is spent as a pupa, in a cocoon that is typically formed among leaf litter, under moss or at the base of a tree.

One of the most familiar of the Pyralidae moth, the Small Magpie is common, easily disturbed by day and often attracted to light.

The caterpillar feeds from a rolled or spun leaf in August and September before spending the winter in a tough silk cocoon in a hollow stem or under the bark. Without further feeding, pupation occurs in the following May in the same cocoon.

Flight Season

Flies from May to September in a single generation but can be recorded as early as February and sometimes as late as November.

A large white or greyish-white furry moth, the Puss moth is named after the cat-like appearance of the adult. The female is generally larger and also differs in having a grey hindwing and sometimes forewing.

A common moth in England but more local further north. Rests with wings tightly rolled, resembling a small cross. Usually a greyish-white to brown in colour. Each pair of spurs on the hind legs has one spur longer than the other.

Caterpillars feed in two overlapping generations from late May to September.

The adult moth is often seen on fence posts, walls and even indoors where they are attracted to light. Can also be found at Ivy blossom, ripe blackberries and, in spring, at sallow blossom.

The typical form of this common species has a distinct black mark on the forewing that is unique among spring-flying moths, but in northern parts, this mark may be the same as the ground colour, or paler.

This moth spends the winter as a pupa in an underground cocoon, with the adult fully formed inside. The caterpillars can be found between April and July, feeding mainly at night on the buds and then the leaves of their foodplant.

Adults fly late in the night, even in cold conditions and can be seen feeding at sallow blossom, also regularly attracted to light and sugar.

The male of this common species has a brownish forewing that is quite variable but can be distinguished by a row of black dots along the edge of both fore- and hindwing. The similar looking Mottled Umber lacks these markings and are less conspicuous in the Scarce Umber.

Caterpillars can be found between April and mid-June. Overwinters as a pupa underground

Males come to light and sometimes in large numbers while the female can be found by day resting on tree-trunks.

Subscribe to Grey