Not found in the UK.

Until recently, and as its name suggests, this butterfly was confined to southern and especially south-eastern Europe, but it is now spreading rapidly in a north-westerly direction, at the rate over 100 km per year. It was first found north of the Alps in France and in Germany in 2008 and has since gradually extended its range and was first sighted in the southern Netherlands in 2015. In 2019 it was reliably recorded near Calais in France. So there is only the matter of the 22 miles of English Channel to cross before it arrives on our shores!  

Not found in the UK.

Size and Family

  • Family: Swallowtails
  • Size: Large
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 70-90mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: N/A                 
  • European Status: Vulnerable

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on stonecrop (Sedum species)

Habitat

Diverse - rocky and stony places and vineyards in hills and mountains.

Extinct from the UK. The Black-veined White was first listed as a British species in 1667 but this large butterfly became extinct in the British Isles around 1925 with its last remaining stronghold in the south-east of England.

It was always considered a rarity in the British Isles but on the continent, it is often very common.

The female is known to rub her wings together and loses many of her scales by doing so, resulting in an almost-transparent look when compared with the white wings of the male. The reason behind this unusual behaviour is not known.

Not found in the UK.

Size and Family

  • Family: Nymphalids
  • Size: Medium
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 35-55mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on leaves of the Nettle-tree (Celtis australis)

Habitat

Open light woodland but also shrubs and even urban places

Not found in the UK.

Overwinters as a caterpillar.

Size and Family

  • Family: Blues & Hairstreaks
  • Size: Small
  • Wing Span Range (male to female): 20-30mm

Conservation Status

  • Butterfly Conservation priority: Low                    
  • European Status: Not threatened

Caterpillar Foodplants

Caterpillars feed on Common Bird's-foot-trefoil and Gorse.

Habitat

Grassy, flowery places such as Meadows, farmland and wasteland.

Not found in the UK. This striking butterfly exhibits seasonal dimorphism, having two forms, levana and prorsa that represent the spring and summer broods. levana individuals are primarily orange in colour, giving them the appearance of a small fritillary, whereas prorsa individuals look more like a small White Admiral.

Not found in the UK. There have been several records of this butterfly in the UK from over the past 150 years but the species is not considered to be migratory and their presence has been attributed to passage by ship.

Not found in the UK. There are two forms of this magnificent butterfly - the blue form ilia and the orange-brown form clytie, the latter is more commonly encountered in southern regions of its distribution.

A small sandy-brown moth with a rather pointed forewing, often fading to a lighter shade of brown.

Easily disturbed by day from grass swords, where it rests on the stems. Flies from late afternoon, at dusk and after dark. Comes to light, sometimes in large numbers. Overwinters as a part-grown caterpillar, on stems near the ground.

Flight Season

Flies from Mid-June to early August in one generation, usually ending by the third week of July.

This species has an annual life cycle. It flies by day in a spinning motion that can be difficult to follow. Adults are seen in May, June and into July, but has been recorded in late April, August and September. The caterpillar feeds from July until autumn on the leaves and flowers of the foodplant, goldenrod, inhabiting a slight silken web under the lower leaves.

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